ARE INSURANCE PREMIUMS REGULATED?

            ARE INSURANCE PREMIUMS REGULATED?

ARE INSURANCE PREMIUMS REGULATED?

 

What are insurance premiums?

An insurance premium is the amount of money charged by a company for active coverage. The sum a person pays in premiums, also referred to as the rate, is determined by several factors, including age, health, and the area a person lives in. People pay these rates annually or in smaller payments over the course of the year, and the amount can change over time. When insurance premiums are not paid, the policy is typically considered void and companies will not honor claims against it.

An insurance premium is the amount of money that an individual or business must pay for an insurance policy. The insurance premium is income for the insurance company, once it is earned, and also represents a liability in that the insurer must provide coverage for claims being made against the policy.

Premiums are paid for many types of insurance, including health insurance, homeowners, and renters insurance. A common example of an insurance premium comes from auto insurance. A vehicle owner can insure the value of his or her vehicle against loss resulting from accident, theft, fire and other potential problems. The owner usually pays a fixed premium amount in exchange for the insurance company’s guarantee to cover any economic losses incurred under the scope of the agreement.

ALSO READ: ARE INSURANCE PREMIUM TAX DEDUCTIBLE?

What do premiums cover?

            Generally, premiums cover whatever is detailed in the insurance policy, and the services provided or paid for depend entirely on the specific policy and type of protection. The following are the most common varieties and the basic services they often cover. Consumers should keep in mind that not all of these types of insurance are available or common in all countries, and there are many other kinds.

 

How does insurance premiums work? A breakdown

The price of an insurance premium for a given insurance policy can vary and depends on a variety of factors. Among those factors is the type of insurance coverage, the likelihood of a claim being made, the area where the policyholder lives or operates a business, the behavior of the person or business being covered, and the amount of competition that the insurer faces. For example, the likelihood of a claim being made against a teenage driver living in an urban area may be higher or lower compared to a teenage driver in a suburban area. In general, the greater the risk associated with a policy, the more expensive the insurance policy will be.

Policyholders may choose from a number of options for paying their insurance premiums. Some insurers allow the policyholder to pay the insurance premium in installments, such as monthly or semi-annual payments, or may require the policyholder to pay the total amount before coverage starts.

Insurance premiums may increase after the policy period ends. The insurer may increase the premium if claims were made during the previous period, if the risk associated with offering a particular type of insurance increases, or if the cost of providing coverage increases.

Compare Coverage and Costs here

Insurers use the insurance premium to cover the liabilities associated with the policies they underwrite. They may also invest the premium in order to generate higher returns and offset some of the costs of providing the insurance coverage, which can help an insurer keep prices competitive. Insurers will invest the premiums in assets with varying levels of liquidity and return, but they are required to maintain a certain level of liquidity. State insurance regulators set the number of liquid assets required to ensure insurers can pay claims.

ALSO READ: ARE INSURANCE COMPANIES INSURED?

Conclusion

Premiums are based on both the risk associated with the insured and the amount of coverage desired. Regulation varies from one insurance company to the other.